Tel Aviv was founded by the Muslim community on the outskirts of the ancient port city of Jaffa (Yafo: ‎ Yāfā) in 1909. Jewish immigration meant that the growth of Tel Aviv soon outpaced Jaffa, which had a majority Arab population at the time.

Tel Aviv and Jaffa were merged into a single municipality in 1950, two years after the establishment of the State of Israel. Tel Aviv’s White City, designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003, comprises the world’s largest concentration of Bauhaus buildings.

Tel Aviv is a technological and economic hub, home to the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange, corporate offices and research and development centers. It is the country’s financial capital and a major performing arts and business center.

Tel Aviv has the second-largest economy in the Middle East after Dubai, and is the 31st most expensive city in the world. With 2.5 million international visitors annually, Tel Aviv is the fifth-most-visited city in the Middle East. It is known as “the city that never sleeps” and a “party capital” due to its lively nightlife, dynamic atmosphere and famous 24-hour culture.